Timecode: The art of capturing the essence of filmmaking

Independent Cinema, Reviews

Short films are the most underrated art form there is: people don’t usually watch them (let it be live action, animation or documentary) and when they are interested in a particular one, it can be extremely difficult to find it on the Internet. As a matter of fact, since I’ve been a film student, the only people I’ve met who are interested in shorts are scholars, cinephiles and students, and even they are turning their backs on this format and try to make feature films in college (as undergraduates, can you believe it??!!). Why is that? I believe it is because short films never get the attention and appreciation they deserve, people don’t want to pay to watch them and it is very unlikely to recover the investment made to produce it. They are seen as a “lesser” production, as something reserved for festivals, but not for the mainstream public. It is like something that students made to learn their craft while hoping to eventually make movies, “real” movies. Well, I disagree: short films are made with extreme precision and craft to make you understand a story, empathize with the characters and, most importantly, make you feel something, in just a few minutes, with a limited number of scenes, characters and means. It’s all about getting to the point in a simple yet complex way, telling a story in the best way possible, without the fare and unnecessary decoration. I’m not saying in any way that making a feature film is easy, not at all, but a longer format gives storytellers more time and more scenes to make you feel everything a short film does in just a few minutes. Timecode, the winner of the Palme d’Or for Best Short Film and Oscar nominee, is the perfect example.

Moonlight: A heartbreaking coming-of-age story

Independent Cinema, Reviews

With the Oscars just a few days away, Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight has garnered unanimous critical acclaim and 8 Academy Award nominations, and though predicted to lose Best Picture Oscar to La La Land (an Academy’s favorite), it is nonetheless a must-see that would have easily won the major award any other year. Jenkins’ exquisite triptych on masculinity, sexuality, love and family is quite the perfect movie.

Manchester by the Sea: a triumph of independent cinema

Independent Cinema, Reviews

Kenneth Lonergan’s return to the big screen as both writer and director after a hiatus of five years has come in the form of this independent realistic film called Manchester by the Sea. Reminiscent of his previous works revolving around family drama and complex characters (themes also present in his directorial debut You Can Count On Me), Manchester by the Sea tells the story of Lee Chandler (Casey Affleck), a janitor who leads a meaningless life, who has to go back to his seaside hometown when his brother Joe dies of a heart disease, making him the legal tutor of his teenage son Patrick.

National Gallery, la mirada de Frederick Wiseman

Independent Cinema, Reviews

Este mes de mayo, la Filmoteca de Catalunya presenta un ciclo dedicado al cineasta Frederick Wiseman, con la muestra de su primera obra, la controvertida Titicut Follies, entre otras. Wiseman estará presente el martes 3 de mayo a las 20:30h para introducir Law and Order, obra de 1969 que muestra el día a día de la policía de Kansas City. La muestra tendrá lugar del 3 al 21 de mayo, toda la información está disponible AQUÍ.  Además, Wiseman recibirá el próximo tres de mayo el título de Doctor Honoris Causa por la Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

Por este motivo, mi artículo de hoy se centra en National Gallery (2014), una ventana a una de las más grandes instituciones en el mundo del arte.