Golden Globes 2018: A Tribute to Strong Women

News

The 2018 Awards Season official kicked off tonight with what has been labeled as the most entertaining show in Hollywood: the Golden Globes. This has been a dark year for Hollywood, with hundreds of sexual harassment allegations against some of the most powerful men in the industry, and the first show of the year was marked by social protest and feminism, in speeches and most importantly wins. Tonight statement had to go beyond words and dresses, and honoring women and works portraying complex women was the best way to do it.

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Molly’s Game: Show, Don’t Tell

Hollywood Cinema Reviews, Reviews

Let me just start by saying that chances are Molly’s Game is going to be the most disappointing movie I’m going to watch this Awards Season and that based on the critics I’ve read online, I’m either wrong about it or the critics love Aaron Sorkin too much to realize it. I had been anticipating this release ever since I heard of a movie written and directed by Aaron Sorkin and starring Jessica Chastain, whom I believe is one of the greatest actresses of her generation, despite never having won an Oscar (although she deserved it for Zero Dark Thirty). It had all the ingredients: one of the best screenwriters in the world, Aaron Sorkin, was going to be able to direct his first feature based on the thrilling real-life story of Molly Bloom.

Cannes 2017: And the winners are…

Hollywood

Cannes 2017 came to an end today and my oh my what an interesting year it has been (despite my lack of entries since I was not there and therefore I can’t comment on that). The 70th edition finished in a very unconventional way, much like its jury President, Pedro Almodóvar, with many additional prizes being awarded, including a tie for Best Screenplay and a special prize for Nicole Kidman, who is clearly having the time of her life (and we love it).

Why is Jimmy Kimmel hosting the Oscars again?

News

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences just announced that late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel will be back to present the Oscars for the second year in a row. I truly love Jimmy Kimmel, I really do, but I feel forced to share my very unpopular opinion with the world: I think this is a huge mistake and I simply can’t understand this decision. These are my reasons (personal AND factual).

Phil Spector: How fiction can make us go beyond prejudice

Reviews

Writing a review on a biopic is never easy, but writing a review on a biopic about a convicted real-life murderer told from the killer’s point of view might be the most difficult task ever (perhaps not “ever”, but pretty much). Phil Spector, the 2013 TV movie directed by David Mamet based on the 2003 murder of the actress Lana Clarkson in hands of one of the most renowned music producers in the world, is, in my opinion, one of the best TV movies made recently by HBO. Is it accurate? Every party will say it is not for different reasons (I myself am not expert on the trial so I’m not going to judge its accuracy), but truth (THE TRUTH) is not its main goal: “This is a work of fiction. It’s not ‘based on a true story.’ It is a drama inspired by actual persons in a trial, but it is neither an attempt to depict the actual persons, nor to comment upon the trial or its outcome.” Phil Spector is a fiction that goes beyond the actual events and challenges our perception of objectivity, bias and celebrity culture.

The Edge of Seventeen: The teenage movie we needed all along

Independent Cinema, Reviews

I am a firm believer that movies (especially American movies) portraying teenagers and high schools and these sorts of things are usually terribly wrong on so many levels: first of all, most of the actors are not even teenagers (Rachel McAdams was 26 when she played Regina George in Mean Girls), every high school looks the same and relies on the same stereotypes (maybe it’s my European point of view, who knows. Please, don’t take me wrong, I still love Mean Girls (the screenplay is simply brilliant) and I grew up obsessed with High School Musical, but the way these types of films depict high school is simply stereotypical and in a way it makes me feel that whomever wrote or directed them is out of touch with the youth and with the real topic of social anxiety among teenagers. Even movies such as The Duff, which criticizes the way teens who do not fit the mold are simply cast aside by popular teens, ends up being a stereotype blown out of proportions. The idea may be realistic but the “mise en scène” is plain wrong. Which is why The Edge of Seventeen is such an important movie and has simply moved me: it is the most relatable movie that I have ever seen, probably in my whole life.

Stutterer: A powerful piece on communication and isolation

Independent Cinema, Reviews

Films have the power to change people’s perception of life. Cinema is considered a way to see life through somebody else’s eyes and experience things that we would not be able to experience firsthand. Short films have the same power, with the added difficulty that they have to make us feel and experience life in just a few minutes, with just a few shots, and yet they can move us and make us understand characters we hadn’t even met some 10 minutes before. They can teach us invaluable lessons so that even though we may have not lived that experience, we can relate it to our own lives, our own experiences. Stutterer, the first film by Irish writer director Benjamin Cleary and winner of the 2016 Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film, tells a story that goes beyond the screen to tackle a theme at the core of our society: communication.

A Hard Day’s Night: An experimental masterpiece

European Films, Reviews

One of the indisputable truths in life is that The Beatles never go out of fashion. This was especially proved last year when the documentary The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years grossed over $12 million at the box office worldwide, which means that despite splitting over 40 years ago, people of all generations still love the Fab Four. It would then be no surprise that the 1964 comedy “mockumentary” A Hard Day’s Night is still wildly popular amongst Beatlemaniacs and just about anyone who likes the Beatles (myself included), but has it stood the test of time?

Awards Season 2017: Records and Milestones

News

So it’s been a week since the Oscars and to be honest, I’m still trying to recover… In fact, I was going to write an entry on my thoughts about this awards season, but the wound is still fresh (maybe next time). So instead, here is an entry on the many records smashed this awards season because yes, it’s been a good year for movies and diversity (and when I say “smashed this awards season” what I really mean is “smashed at this year’s Academy Awards and maybe some other shows”). If you type “Oscars 2017 records” or “Golden Globes 2017 records” on Google, the headline that is invariably going to appear is “La La Land receives record-tying 14 Oscar nominations” and “La La Land wins record-breaking 7 Golden Globes”. And let’s face it, for someone like me who loves La La Land (and will continue to love it until the end of time), that is really cool. But these were not the only records broken in a year unquestionably more diverse than the previous two editions of #OscarsSoWhite. So, here are some of the records and milestones of the 2017 awards season:

Oscars 2017: Moonlight wins Best Picture in a confusing ending

News

In a totally unexpected turn of events, Moonlight took home the Best Picture Oscar, something no poll had predicted. In fact, it became the most confusing moment of recent award shows since presenter Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway initially announced La La Land as the winner of this category. After a few seconds of confusion (and midway through the acceptance speech), not really knowing whether the producer of the film, Jordan Horrowitz was joking when he said Moonlight had won the award, Barry Jenkins’ team was called to the stage and given the coveted prize. This wild ending will go down in Oscars history, and probably not in a good way. Warren and Dunaway were given the wrong envelope (whose fault is that), and Dunaway just announced the winner without properly reading the envelope. How could this even happen and how could it happen in the most important award of the night?